Andreas Herberg-Rothe

is an internationally renowned Clausewitz scholar and senior lecturer at the faculty of social and cultural studies at Fulda University of Applied Sciences in Germany. His last book was titled “Lessons from World War I for the Rise of Asia”. Together with Key-young Son (Seoul) he has just finished the manuscript of a new book under the title “In between East and West: Floating balance, harmony, recognition and order wars in the twenty-first century” (forthcoming 2017).

Equality - liberty and human rights MPC Journal

Freedom and Equality in Unequal World

What is the greatest difference between the cold-war order and the 21st-century global order? A cold war joke offers a good hint. An East German school teacher asks little Fritz: “Fritzchen, why are you always speaking of our Soviet brothers? It’s ‘Soviet friends’.” Fritz responds: “Well, you can pick your friends.” Back then, they had no freedom to choose, but still enjoyed a form of stability through comradeship or alliances in a bipolar balance of power. Now, we can make choices, but these choices do not guarantee any degree of strategic stability. Globalisation has injected a sense of fluidity, uncertainty,…
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A woman cries over the coffin of a suicide bombing victim during a commemoration ceremony in a mosque in Ankara, Turkey

How Radical Ideologies Thrive in Divided World

Terrorism and other attacks by disillusioned youth reinforce the need to rediscover equality as a human right. Forms of seemingly irrational violence within society and even sexualised or racial violence are dramatically on the rise worldwide. We see radicalisation and especially a turn to ideology in communities, societies and states. The common denominator is a type of thinking characterised by the feeling of “We against the Rest”. At the same time, people everywhere struggle with the loss of their identity in today’s “liquid modernity”, a concept coined by sociologist Zygmunt Bauman.

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