Author Archive:

Hakim Khatib

Hakim Khatib studied political science of the Middle East, European Studies, journalism and linguistics. He has been lecturing at different German universities since 2011 on issues related to ideology and the interplay of power thereof in socio-political life, and religion and its relationship to contemporary politics in the regions of West Asia and North Africa, especially Egypt and Syria. He is also the editor-in-chief of the Mashreq Politics & Culture Journal (MPC Journal) since 2014 and has published over 100 articles in different languages, academic and otherwise, in a wide spectrum of on-line and printed newspapers, journals and think tanks. His current research focuses on Islam-inspired political ideologies such as Islamist extremism and Salafism, radicalisation, de-radicalisation processes in Germany as well as peace and conflict in the Middle East.

This female truck driver broke stereotypes and made waves in Egyptian media in 2017.

Feminism and the Egyptian Culture

The question of Egyptian culture’s compatibility with feminism has been one highly debated in recent years. In this discourse, Arab women become entrapped in the confines of both the Western feminist lens which neglects them, and Arabs who oppose Western influence. The history of Egyptian feminism is both rich, and complex in that it is intertwined with Islam, nationalism, and post-colonialism. The reason for this is that national consciousness, which emerged in reaction to Western colonialism in the 18th century, developed simultaneously with feminist consciousness.

The Next Wave Of Change In The Arab World

The Next Wave of Change in the Arab World

Within the geopolitical framework of North Africa, Algeria and Sudan are undergoing profound and irreversible change. The images of hundreds of thousands of people walking the streets of major cities and being met with limited violence is making possible the environment in which the next chapter in these countries’ respective stories is one of moving forward. This is not Arab Spring II because the drivers of change in each country are different. The timing of the upheavals is only due to temporal issues related to each country’s immediate history and the surrounding geopolitical environment, which is moving quickly from one…
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"We Are All ISIS," propaganda from Islamic State.

New Pro-Islamic State Magazine: An Ideological Threat

The Islamic State (IS) terrorist group, persists to propagate its ideas to the Indonesian and Malay speaking communities through its supporters in the new Hanifiyah Media magazine. Apart from spreading its ideas on religion and politics, the latest pro-IS propaganda also serves as a riposte to current counter-ideological initiatives.

President Bouteflika spoke for the first time since the beginning of the demonstrations in Algeria, via a statement, on March 7, 2019. AFP (archives)

The Algerian Crisis Of March 2019

Since last February 22, Algeria has been shaken by street demonstrations that occur almost simultaneously in all the 48 provinces of the country.  Working on the assumption that the people’s anger is entirely spontaneous, its immediate origin is the announcement by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika  he wants to run for his fifth term, which should start following the elections scheduled for next April.

Demonstrators raising Tunisian and Rainbow flags during a march at the World Social Forum 2015 in Tunisia Jalila Baccar © Image: #Mawjoudin

Tunisian LGBT+ Organisation under Attack

The Tunisian government is attempting to dissolve Shams, a local association that defends the rights of LGBT+ people. Tunisian authorities have launched an appeal to overturn a 2016 court ruling, which concluded Shams, following previous attempts to shut the organization down. The authorities appealed the decision on the grounds that Shams’ stated goals contradict Tunisia’s religious principles and culture.

Why the Iraqi City Basra Will Not Go Away - MPC Journal

Why the Iraqi City Basra Will Not Go Away

In late 2018, 100,000 people were hospitalized in Basra, Iraq over the period of a few weeks, inundating hospitals and creating a frenzy of media attention. They were poisoned by the city’s toxic water supply, which was pumped untreated after a heat wave knocked out the city’s water treatment facilities. Despite months of protests inside Basra to protest their unlivable conditions, little was accomplished: the city’s polluted water infrastructure remains under repaired and underserved even as its oil almost single-handedly funds the Iraqi state.

Former Saudi Ambassador to the United States Turki Al Faisal Al-Saud speaks during the 27th annual Arab-U.S. Policymakers conference on 31 October, 2018 [Alex Wong/Getty Images]

Secret Israel-Saudi Relations Date Back As Far As 25 Years

The ex-Saudi Intelligence Chief Turki Al-Faisal this weekend revealed that secret relations between Israel and a number of Gulf states date back as far as 25 years. According to Qatari newspaper Al-Arab, Al-Faisal was interviewed by Israeli journalist Barak Ravid, who claims to have conducted interviews with 20 prominent Gulf officials with knowledge of secret relations with Israel. However, many of these people refused to speak to the camera, Israel’s Channel 13 reported.

Hafsa says people see her headscarf and assume she is straight, married or a parent

Too Queer to Be Muslim and too Muslim to Be Queer

Hafsa Qureshi says being Muslim and bisexual has seen friends reject her and discrimination at work. She describes why it’s vital to break stereotypes and encourage diverse LGBT+ role models.

6% of Iranian Girls Married under 14

6% of Iranian Girls Married under 14

A shocking 6% of Iranian girls get married between 10 and 14, according to an Iranian MP. While 6% of all Iranian girls are married before the age of 14, the percentage increases to 17% for those married before the age of 18.

aqis protest against unemployment and lack of public services in Baghdad, 27 July 2018. Picture by Ameer Al Mohammedaw/DPA/PA Images. All rights reserved.

Post-Sectarian Iraq Between Theory and Practice

Iraq arguably entered a new phase of ‘post-sectarianism’ since 2015. This was evident during the popular protests that began in the summer of 2015 and returned significantly in the summer of 2018 – when Iraqi political activism transformed from identity politics to being issue based. This showed that the protests are driven by frustration and demands for improving the poor public services and the high unemployment figures, rather than the usual politically led religious and ethnic differences. Specifically, the transition was motivated by the failure of the ethnic-sectarian political class in providing efficient public services, education, health care, security and…
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