Author Archive:

Hakim Khatib

Hakim Khatib studied political science of the Middle East, European Studies, journalism and linguistics. He has been lecturing at different German universities since 2011 on issues related to ideology and the interplay of power thereof in socio-political life, and religion and its relationship to contemporary politics in the regions of West Asia and North Africa, especially Egypt and Syria. He is also the editor-in-chief of the Mashreq Politics & Culture Journal (MPC Journal) since 2014 and has published over 100 articles in different languages, academic and otherwise, in a wide spectrum of on-line and printed newspapers, journals and think tanks. His current research focuses on Islam-inspired political ideologies such as Islamist extremism and Salafism, radicalisation, de-radicalisation processes in Germany as well as peace and conflict in the Middle East.

Lebanese Security Forces Try to Close LGBT Conference

Lebanese Security Forces Try to Close LGBT Conference

  Lebanese General Security officers unlawfully attempted to shut down a conference on the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people on September 29, 2018, Human Rights Watch said today. Human Rights Watch staff members were among the participants at NEDWA, a conference organized by the Arab Foundation for Freedoms and Equality (AFE), a group that works to advance LGBT and other human rights.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman denies that Saudi Arabia abducted Jamal Khashoggi (Reuters)

Saudi’s Long History of Abductions

Riyadh has repeatedly been accused of kidnapping and sending dissidents back to the Gulf kingdom, accusations it denies. Jamal Khashoggi walked into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Tuesday to pick up a document. Handing his phone to his fiance, he told her to call for help if he did not come out. Hours later Khashoggi was nowhere to be seen, raising fears that the outspoken Saudi journalist had been kidnapped and possibly rendered to Saudi Arabia. Since then, the Turkish police have launched a probe and claimed that Khashoggi was murdered inside the consulate. A claim Saudi Arabia has…
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Extraordinary Ways in Which China Humiliates Muslims

Extraordinary Ways in Which China Humiliates Muslims

Bans on “abnormal” beards and even the name “Muhammad” CHINESE officials describe the far western province of Xinjiang as a “core area” in the vast swathe of territory covered by the country’s grandiose “Belt and Road Initiative” to boost economic ties with Central Asia and regions beyond. They hope that wealth generated by the scheme will help to make Xinjiang more stable—for years it has been plagued by separatist violence which China says is being fed by global jihadism. But the authorities are not waiting. In recent months they have intensified their efforts to stifle the Islamic identity of Xinjiang’s…
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Cairo, Egypt - © Photo: Hakim Khatib/MPC Journal

Egypt’s Economic Pain Is All in a Good Cause

Before the 2011 revolution that deposed Hosni Mubarak, Egypt had undergone a few reform periods between 1991 and 2007 in an effort to reduce external debt and expand the role of the private sector. As a result of those reforms, Egypt was able to relax some price controls, tackle double-digit inflation, reduce subsidies and cut taxes.

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Iran Sanctions Conundrum

Trump administration’s decision to withdraw itself from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action followed by its announcement to re-impose sanctions is viewed as one of the most disruptive geopolitical events of recent times. This has thrown down the gauntlet to India to recalibrate its ties with both the US and Iran. However, the upcoming high-level 2+2 dialogue certainly holds the key to this challenge. 

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Love & Violence: Inside Morocco’s LGBT+ Community

Omar is a 21-year-old gay Moroccan. He spends his life looking over his shoulder, trying not to draw attention to himself. I interviewed Omar while researching my book, Gender and Violence in the Middle East, and he told me: Personally, I try to be discreet, avoid getting too much attention when I’m in certain places or with people who could react badly. Omar’s fears are rooted in the fact that homosexuality is a criminal offence in Morocco, as it is in many other African countries. The law combines with a strongly conservative society to create a real sense of danger for members of Morocco’s lesbian,…
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Jihadists: They Love Death As We Love Life

French extremism researcher Olivier Roy talks to Eren Guvercin about the Catch 22 situation of European Muslims expected to speak for Islam, the irrelevance of ‘liberal’ reforms, the false premise of current de-radicalisation programmes and the nature of modern terrorism.

Who is the Turkish Televangelist Adnan Oktar?

Who is the Turkish Televangelist Adnan Oktar?

On 11 July 2018, Turkish police detained the cult leader televangelist Adnan Oktar along with 234 people associated with him over accusations including forming a criminal gang, fraud and sexual abuses. The Istanbul police raided 120 residences and offices after criminal complaints filed by multiple plaintiffs, whose ages range from 11 to 40 years old.

Iraqi students walk near a building of the central Library of the University of Mosul

The Rise of Iraq’s Young Secularists

MOSUL, Iraq—Rayyan Hadidi was 18 years old when he lost his faith. It was July 2006, and he was on his way to school when he stumbled upon a cheering crowd that had gathered near a local mosque. The group, made up mostly of mosque leaders and worshippers, had encircled two men accused of volunteering with the Iraqi police force, which many saw as a puppet of the American occupiers. Al-Qaeda gunmen brandished their arms, preparing to execute the men, as the crowd shouted, “Allahu akbar.” Hadidi stared at the two men, flinching when he made eye contact with one…
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Tunisian Anthropologist: Homosexuality Permissible in Quran

The Tunisian anthropologist Yusef Al-Siddiq commented on the final report of the Individual Freedoms and Equality Committee (also known by the acronym COLIBE), a presidential commission comprised of legislators, professors and human rights advocates. Al-Siddiq said, “the Quran did not call for the punishment of homosexuals”.

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