Author Archive: Neville Teller

Neville Teller

was born in London and is a graduate of Oxford University. He has been commenting on the Middle East scene for over thirty years. He is Middle East correspondent for the Eurasia Review and his articles also appear regularly in other publications and in his blog “A Mid-East Journal”. His books include “One Man’s Israel” (2008), “One Year in the History of Israel and Palestine” (2011) and “The Search for Détente” (2014). A past chairman of the Society of Authors’ Broadcasting Committee, he is a veteran radio and audio dramatist and abridger. In the Queen’s Birthday Honours in 2006 he was awarded the MBE for services to broadcasting and drama.

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Could Putin Out-Trump Trump on Jerusalem?

At the heart of the constitution of the United States lies the principle of the separation of powers.  Conceived as a way to prevent the abuse of power generally, it has been used mainly to stop excessive power accumulating in the hands of the President.  Ex-President Obama is on the record as finding the system “frustrating”.  As for Donald Trump, from the moment he assumed office he has been challenged by the legislature and the judiciary.  He spent his first 100 days seeing some of his main electoral promises being foiled – from repealing the nation’s health care law to…
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Has Trump Set the Peace Ball Rolling?

US President Donald Trump left Israel on Tuesday afternoon, 23 May 2017, after a visit lasting just 28 hours.  In the words of the leader in the Jerusalem Post the next morning, “his major contribution to the peace process so far has been his successful resuscitation of non-cynical discourse on the prospects of peace.  But the truly hard work has barely begun.”

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Rouhani’s Bitter-Sweet Triumph

The 20th of May 2017 was a red letter day for Middle East politics.  Not only was Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, re-elected by a substantial majority to a second term of office, but it was the day that US President Trump, on the opening leg of his first foreign tour, landed in Saudi Arabia to a right royal reception and, within hours, was signing a multi-billion dollar deal with his hosts. 

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UK Peers Urge Pro-Iran, Pro-Palestinian Policies

A year ago, in May 2016, Britain’s House of Lords decided to establish a new International Relations Committee.  On 2 May 2017, after six months deliberation, the committee issued its second report: “The Middle East: Time for New Realism”.   It is, quite frankly, an astonishing document, imbued with unconcealed hostility towards, and distrust of, US President Donald Trump, with the anti-Brexit rhetoric of much of the British establishment, and with downright naïve recommendations, reflecting the consensus of the politically correct, concerning Saudi Arabia, the Iran nuclear deal, and Palestinian sovereignty.

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Can Deal-maker Trump Facilitate Israeli-Palestinian Peace?

US President Donald Trump has one attribute that his greatest friends and most impassioned enemies are agreed on – he is a great deal-maker.  Deal-making has been the key to his business success, which has been considerable.  And way back in the 1980s he co-authored “The Art of the Deal” which reached number 1 on the New York Times Best Seller list, and stayed there for 13 weeks.

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Hezbollah and the balance of power in Lebanon

Lebanon’s president, Michel Aoun, is a fervent Hezbollah supporter; Lebanon’s prime minister, Saad Hariri, most certainly is not.  Hariri’s position is scarcely surprising, since he has every reason to believe that back in 2005 his father, Rafik, was brutally assassinated by Hezbollah operatives, acting on the orders of Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad.

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What Will Erdogan Do with Supreme Power?

The news from Turkey following the referendum on 16 April is worrying.  The coup attempt on 20 July 2016, in which rogue troops commandeered fighter jets and tanks to bomb parliament, led the Turkish cabinet to declare a six-month state of emergency.  On 19 January, as the six months drew to a close, the state of emergency was extended for a further three months.  Now, following the referendum, the Turkish cabinet has once again added three months to the extraordinary powers permitted the president and his government under the terms of the emergency legislation.

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Egypt’s Economic Tightrope

Egypt’s government, under the leadership of Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, is firmly wedged between a rock and a hard place – on the one hand the danger of economic collapse; on the other simmering popular discontent, which could descend into open revolt, at the steps being taken to relieve the problem.

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Saudi Vision 2030 One Year on

The kingdom of Saudi Arabia is such an established feature of today’s Middle East that it comes as something of a surprise to realize that it is less than a hundred years old. It was only in 1932 that Abdul Aziz ibn Saud, after a 30-year political and military struggle against local warlords and the Ottoman Empire, named the area that he had conquered “Saudi Arabia”, and proclaimed himself its first king.

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