Author Archive: Neville Teller

Neville Teller

was born in London and is a graduate of Oxford University. He has been commenting on the Middle East scene for over thirty years. He is Middle East correspondent for the Eurasia Review and his articles also appear regularly in other publications and in his blog “A Mid-East Journal”. His books include “One Man’s Israel” (2008), “One Year in the History of Israel and Palestine” (2011) and “The Search for Détente” (2014). A past chairman of the Society of Authors’ Broadcasting Committee, he is a veteran radio and audio dramatist and abridger. In the Queen’s Birthday Honours in 2006 he was awarded the MBE for services to broadcasting and drama.

Mideast Yemen

Positive Action in Yemen Yields Positive Results

If any one area is a microcosm of the chaos in the Middle East, it is Yemen. Here, as across the region, Islam has been at war with itself, as the deadly rivalry between Saudi Arabia’s Sunni fundamentalist ruling family, and Iran’s equally uncompromising Shia-based Islamic revolution, played itself out. Nowhere was the fault-line between the Shia and the Sunni traditions of Islam more obvious – and nowhere was it more blurred, as self-seeking interests cut across it. Who is fighting whom in Yemen? There are four main principals: The Iranian-supported Houthi rebels; the lawful president, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi;…
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How to Defeat Islamic State – The Blair Recipe

Tony Blair is a man of wisdom and experience, a global player with many positive achievements to his credit, but in UK politics he is a spent force. The charismatic leader who transformed the fortunes of Britain’s Labour Party and led it to three successive election victories, is now the object of scorn by those in charge of the party. They have utterly rejected his middle-of-the-road approach, with its appeal to a wide swathe of moderate electors, in favour of a sharp turn to the left under their new leader, Jeremy Corbyn. Nowadays many who supported Blair while he was…
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Could an Anti-Iran Alliance Be a New Force for Peace?

Could an Anti-Iran Alliance Be a New Force for Peace?

Quite why or how it happened has yet to be fully determined, but the early years of the 21st century have seen the Middle East morph into a gigantic battleground.  Political and religious antagonisms, both ancient and newly conceived, have flared into armed conflict in a dozen places across the region. The ancient fault line within Islam, present from the earliest days of the faith but quiescent for long periods of time, has suddenly become one of the defining elements of the turmoil – the Sunni-Shia divide.  Saudi Arabia, with Mecca and Medina within its borders, is the flag-bearer for…
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Russia and the US Battle It out in Syria Image ©: GETTY IMAGES mpc-journal.org

Russia and the US Battle It Out in Syria

Despite the fragile ceasefire that has brought a brief respite to the indiscriminate bombing of soldiers and civilians alike, the situation that has developed in Syria is fraught with dangers, contradictions and ironies.   In September 2014, in pursuit of restoring stability to that war-ravaged country, a US-led coalition of nations engaged in a twin-objective military effort – in itself almost a recipe for disaster.  The first aim was to defeat the rampant Islamic State (IS) that had seized large swathes of the country; the second to remove President Bashar Al-Assad from power and establish democratic governance.  There was one proviso:  There were…
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The Commonwealth and Arab-Israel Reconciliation mpc-journal.org

The Commonwealth and Arab-Israel Reconciliation

In 2016 Commonwealth Day falls on March 14. That may not mean much to some people, but to the 53 member nations of the Commonwealth, representing some 2.2 billion people, it means a whole range of events sponsored by governments, schools, community groups and individuals, intended to promote the inclusivity of the organization. On March 14 activities the world over will aim to promote international co-operation and “Commonwealth values.” What are they, these “Commonwealth values”?

Libya – Something Should Be Done Image ©:AP PHOTO/RODRIGO ABD

Libya – Something Should Be Done

“Something should be done” is a phrase which resonates with students of Britain’s political history.  It was the off-the-cuff comment made by short-term King Edward VIII in November 1936, just a month before he abdicated to marry the American divorcée Wallis Simpson.  He was visiting an abandoned colliery in an area of high unemployment. “These works brought all these people here,” he said.  “Something should be done to get them at work again.” The remark created a furore in British political circles, since it was taken as a royal rebuke to the government for not doing enough to tackle the…
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