Tag Archive: religion

New Cairo, Sept. 2015: President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi (R) greets Sheik Ahmed El-Tayeb, Grand Imam of Al-Azhar; Egypt’s president is demanding the clergy tone down radical discourse on Islam (source: dpa)

Al-Azhar and Sisi’s Regime: Cooperation and Conflict

Tensions between Egypt’s religious leadership and its political leadership—represented by the Grand Imam of al-Azhar, Ahmed el-Tayeb, and Egypt’s President respectively—have reached a point where they can no longer be concealed. The underlying disagreement has become public, and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi has raised this issue in his public speeches, the most recent of which dealt with verbal divorce, to the point where Sisi told el-Tayeb, “you’ve exhausted me, honorable Imam.” The Council of Senior Scholars, which is headed by the Sheikh of al-Azhar, rejected Sisi’s call for divorce to be documented in order for it to be recognized….
Read more

Beres

Are the Faithful More Selfish Than Atheists?

Common complaints about atheism go like this: How could you think that all this is for no reason? Who are you to say that you know there is no God/plan/divine order? How much hubris are you filled with to make such a claim?

Analysis of Arab societies through sectarianism does not grasp the complex dynamics of identity politics in the region. MPC Journal/Hakim Khatib

Unlike Sects, Sectarianism Is Real In Arabic Speaking World

Last week, Saudi writer and journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, wrote a piece in the London-based al-Hayat newspaper in which he argued that “Sunnis” were targeted as a group and called on them to ‘defend themselves as a sect’. Such flawed, reductionist and ill-informed analysis contributes to little more than reminding us that sectarianism is actually a fait accompli.

Religious Conservatism Redefines Symbolism of National Sports Teams

Religious Conservatism Redefines Symbolism of National Sports Teams

Over the past decade, religiosity and religious intolerance have seeped into national sports teams in Pakistan and Egypt, societies that have been wracked by faith-based narrow-mindedness and political fanaticism. The trend is exemplified by two national team managers, a controversial Pakistani cricket captain and a storied Egyptian midfielder-turned-glorified-soccer coach. The trend reflects the devastating impact of religious and/or political intolerance in Pakistan and Egypt. It has redefined the symbolism of Pakistan’s national cricket team and Egypt’s national soccer squad. Governments as well as national and international sports associations have encouraged the trend by failing to enforce good governance. Both managers,…
Read more

Bible-Quran

Violence More Common in Bible Than Quran

“Violence more common” in Bible than Quran, text analysis reveals The Old Testament was found to be more than twice as violent as the Quran An analysis into whether the Quran is more violent than the Bible found killing and destruction occur more frequently in the Christian texts than the Islamic. Investigating whether the Quran really is more violent than its Judeo-Christian counterparts, software engineer Tom Anderson processed the text of the Holy books to find which contained the most violence.

Menu Title